This is How to Score a Perfect At-Home Pedicure

I’ve devoted plenty of column space on this blog to the potential dangers of nail salons. Unclean equipment can leave you vulnerable to infection. Salon technicians who remove your cuticle leave you vulnerable to infection. And if those techs trim your nails too short, or in the wrong shape? You can end up with an ingrown toenail.

Once you consider all the potential risks—not to mention the costs—associated with getting a pedicure at the salon, you may be rethinking your current beauty routine. And that’s where I come in. Just check out this quick and easy plan for scoring the perfect home pedicure—with special thanks to Yahoo! Lifestyle for the inspo.

The Perfect Home Pedicure in Just 7 Steps

Step 1: Take off previous polish It may feel luxurious to turn your toenails over to someone else, but a DIY pedicure is much safer for your feet!

If you’ve got some old color on your toes, use polish remover and cotton balls and gently rub it away. Stay away from products with acetone, as they can damage your nail. If you notice yellow spots on your nails once the polish is gone, trying rubbing the spots with cuticle oil. Or, better yet, leave the nails unpolished for a week or so to allow the nail to breathe and the staining to disappear on its own.

Step 2: Get wet

After removing all old polish, treat your feet to a warm soak. Fill up your tub with warm—not hot—water—then add in body wash and Epsom salts to the water. Soak for 15 minutes, to help reduce any foot swelling, eliminate nasty odors and kill any bacteria that may be lurking on the surface of your skin.

Step 3: Trim or File your nails

Now it’s time to start in on your nails. Grab your manicure scissors and gently trim the nail, being careful not to remove too much nail, and working straight across to help prevent ingrown nails. If you have any sharp outgrowths at the corners, simply file them down—never cut nails in this area.

Step 4: Lotions and oil

You should never remove your cuticles—they help form a barrier between your nails and nasty sources of infection—but you can gently push them down to help prevent hangnails. At this stage of the pedicure, you can moisturize the cuticle with cuticle oil, then go ahead and moisturize the rest of your feet, too! When the pampering is done, dry the areas between your toes to prevent fungal growth. Then, separate the toes using separators or woven paper towel strands, so toes don’t rub against each other and smudge your polish.

Step 5: Make a base

Prop up your foot and paint on a strengthening base coat. Position your brush in the middle of your nail, just above the cuticle and swipe up from base to tip. Repeat with stripes on the left and right side. Allow the base coat at least two minutes to drive before moving on to the polish.

Step 6: Apply the polish Blow drying your feet is a great way to keep polish from smudging, and fungus from forming between your toes!

Now it’s time to get colorful. Use the same technique as you used for the base coat but, once again, be careful about the product you choose. Many polishes contain very harmful chemicals—that’s why, in our office, we carry Dr. Remedy’s line of polishes. Not only are they free from harmful chemicals, they can actually help strengthen your nail while making it pretty!  

Step 7: Dry time 

Nails typically need a solid 20 minutes to dry if you want to avoid smudging. Don’t have that kind of time on your hands? No worries. You can choose to apply a fast-drying top coat. Or, if you prefer, grab your blow dryer and aim it at your toes and feet on a low setting. Bonus: if you go the hairdryer route, you can ensure no moist spots were left behind after the soaking and moisturizing steps, which means you’re getting rid of any spots that would be ripe for fungal growth! And, in this podiatrist’s mind, that’s a win for everyone!

 

Dr. Andrew Schneider
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Dr. Andrew Schneider is a podiatrist and foot surgeon at Tanglewood Foot Specialists in Houston, TX.
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