A Podiatrist Can Treat My Broken Foot? YES!

IMPORTANT COVID-19 INFORMATION

At this time, our office continues to be open to new and existing patients. We use hospital-grade sanitizers and are taking measures to ensure patients maintain social distancing by not having anyone wait in our reception room with others. We are continuing operation in an effort to keep patients out of the urgent care clinics and hospital emergency departments, which increases the chances of being exposed to the virus. We have x-ray and ultrasound in the office to prevent you from having to go elsewhere.

For those patients who cannot or wish not to visit the office, we are offering private video telemedicine visits. Simply call the office at 713-785-7881 and ask for an e-visit and we will be happy to get you set up for an immediate appointment. You can also request an appointment through our website.

Common foot fractures seen by Houston podiatristNo one plans to break their foot.  It just happens.  You can twist the wrong way playing a sport, step into a hole in the parking lot, or trip and fall.  Foot fractures are unique in that you have to bear weight on your foot after it heals.  For that reason, it is crucial to have your foot evaluated and treated.  In Houston, TX, a podiatrist is uniquely suited to handle this all in the office...no waiting in the ER!

A fracture is a break in the bone, which is caused by trauma. The foot or ankle will appear bruised and swollen and will likely be very painful. A fracture is often not displaced and may be simply treated by immobilizing the foot, ankle, and leg to allow the bone to heal. There are times where the fracture is more severe and will need to be corrected surgically.

A stress fracture is not caused by a particular trauma but rather a continuous repetitive stress. This type of fracture is often seen in athletes and “weekend warriors.”  A stress fracture, however, can happen to anyone. It does not present with bruising, but rather with a moderate amount of swelling. The pain is not severe, but can often be described as a bad ache. It is important to have a stress fracture immobilized to allow the bone to heal, recover, and return to full strength. Once healed, we use orthotics to manage the pressure and stress on the bone which will prevent a reoccurrence of the fracture.

Dr. Andrew Schneider
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Dr. Andrew Schneider is a podiatrist and foot surgeon at Tanglewood Foot Specialists in Houston, TX.