What's the best way to heal a diabetic ulcer?

IMPORTANT COVID-19 INFORMATION

Our office continues to be open to all new and existing patients. We use hospital-grade sanitizers and are taking measures to ensure patients maintain social distancing by not having anyone wait in our reception room with others. If you prefer to wait in your car, just give us a call and we will call or text you when we are ready to bring you straight into a treatment room. Our entire staff is wearing masks and we encourage you to do the same.

For those patients who cannot or still wish not to visit the office, we are offering private video telemedicine visits. Simply call the office at 713-785-7881 and ask for an e-visit and we will be happy to get you set up for an immediate appointment. You can also request an appointment through our website.

Houston podiatrist treats and heals diabetic foot ulcersA diabetic foot ulcer is a common and dangerous complication of diabetes. An ulcer forms because of increased pressure beneath the foot. This excessive pressure leads to a breakdown of the skin and forms an ulcer. While there are all types of advanced wound dressings, which serve an important purpose, none are as important as controlling the pressure that has caused the ulcer to form in the first place.

 

It makes sense if you think about it. The pressure beneath the diabetic foot ulcer is the cause and the wound is the result of that pressure. To successfully treat the ulcer, we need to heal the wound while simultaneously controlling the pressure. Unfortunately this important element of wound care is overlooked by many practitioners and resisted by many patients.

 

Offloading a wound properly requires some inconvenience and disruption in your lifestyle. Different doctors use different methods to remove the pressure from a wound. Some apply casts, others use a cast boot, still others use a specialized healing shoe. There are even times where surgery may be needed to remove the pressure from the ulcer site. Adding padding to your existing shoes, or even using diabetic shoes, is not sufficient to keep the pressure away.

 

After your diabetic foot ulcer is healed, you are not completely out of the woods. It is vital to continue to control the pressure to prevent the wound from returning. This is where a diabetic shoe is appropriate.

 

Of course, the best way to treat a diabetic foot ulcer is to prevent one from forming. Every person with diabetes should be seen regularly by a podiatrist in Houston to identify and manage risk factors and ensure you are wearing the proper shoes. If you or someone you love has diabetes, especially if you are concerned about a diabetic foot ulcer forming or not healing, contact Dr. Andrew Schneider for an immediate appointment. Just say "I'm diabetic and have a problem" and we'll get you in right away.

Dr. Andrew Schneider
Connect with me
Dr. Andrew Schneider is a podiatrist and foot surgeon at Tanglewood Foot Specialists in Houston, TX.