How To Stop Your Heel From Slipping In Your Running Shoes

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It is very common to have patients tell me that they feel their heel slipping out of their running shoe. This could happen for a number of reason. First, some people have trouble finding a perfectly fitting running shoe and they feel their heel slipping out a bit. In other cases, someone might have a wider forefoot, such as a bunion deformity, which makes them size their shoe to fit the forefoot and the rearfoot is too narrow and slips. Finally, someone may have started to wear a new custom orthotic, which lifts their heel up slightly and their heel starts to piston in and out of the shoe.

Fortunately, there is a very simple lacing technique to help combat the heel slippage. Most running shoes have an extra eyelet that is offset closest to your ankle. Most people don't lace their shoes through that eyelet, which is absolutely fine. When the heel is slipping, that is what the eyelet is there for. Some people just lace their shoes through that eyelet, but there is a more specialized way of using it.

For a demonstration of the lacing technique, be sure to watch the video. Start off by taking the shoelace and placing it through the eyelet on the SAME side of the shoe. This will form a small loop. Do the same for the other side. You will then take the end of the lace and place it through the OPPOSITE loop. When you tighten the laces, the loops on either side will cinch down and help to keep you to the back of the shoes.

When you first start lacing your shoe this way, you may notice more tension on the front of the ankle, but it should not be to the point where it is bothersome. If you have any further questions about this technique, or have a foot problem that needs to be addressed, contact us for an immediate appointment.

Dr. Andrew Schneider
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A podiatrist and foot surgeon in Houston, TX.